Officer of the Court – Waco Police Department Ben Rush

Officer of the Court Benjamin Rush has had a roller coaster of a life on the streets of Waco, at home, and in and out of the courtrooms of McLennan County. His wife, former Hallsburg teacher Patricia Rush, should be a felon for her improper relationship with one of her 13 year old male students, as court reports show from 2013. She is not required to register as a sex offender, nor did she do any prison time, all swept away with a stroke of the pen, for everyone except the victim(s).

The plea bargain with the attorney general’s office will not require Rush to register as a sex offender and calls for her to receive deferred probation for eight years. If Rush, 40, successfully completes deferred probation, she will not have a conviction on her record.

Rush pleaded guilty to recklessly causing non-specified “mental injury” to the boy.

In exchange for her guilty plea, the attorney general’s office will dismiss eight counts remaining against Rush.

Her attorney, Bill Johnston, said Rush is glad to have this unfortunate chapter in her life resolved.

WPD Officer Ben Rush in Court 10-23-17
WPD Officer Ben Rush in Court 10-23-17

Being in the courtroom alone could trigger this mans P.T.S.D. from what he has been through. Merely thinking of his wife calling, desperate to find out if her insurance policy would be needed, must have been dramatic, correction, traumatic for them.

Rush goes on to state several things that the District Attorney needed to get on the record, such as did Rush recognize a man on a blue motorcycle, with a white helmet, riding gloves, and black rims on his tires.

Officer of the Court Rush did not recognize the white helmeted rider on the blue bike, Reyna continued on in his requests to describe what was shown on the large courtroom video screen. Rush’s dash-cam video shows him moving from the parking lot across the small road from where both Don Carlos, and Twin Peaks parking areas shared a grassy median separating the two businesses properties.

Rush’s dash-cam follows his team as they bound down the median. Watch more of the Testimony from October, 23rd 2017 on a few different news stations archived on this site for historical purposes.

October 24th 2017 Testimony from Twin Peaks Biker Trials

KCEN’s brief coverage of the morning testimony from a bartender/waitress from Twin Peaks

video


Testimony for WPD Officer Samuel Key.
video

KWTX coverage of the morning testimony from Waco Police Department S.W.A.T. team member and Army Veteran Micheal “the Butcher” Bucher.

video

video

October 25th 2017 Testimony from Twin Peaks Biker Trials

Morning Testimony in the Twin Peaks Biker Trials in Waco, Texas.

video

Second part of Testimony in the Twin Peaks Biker Trials in Waco, Texas.

video

Some of this video footage will be overlapping due to the live feed aspect, and the recording process. None of these videos are edited, simply archived for future reference. Hopefully Americans will want to know more about the largest political ambush in American History.

video

October 23rd 2017 Testimony from Twin Peaks Biker Trials

This video was from the morning session of the Twin Peaks trial in McLennan County Texas on 10/23/2017.
Testimony after the first break from Waco Police Department on October 23, 2017.

video

Notes:
Officer of the Court – Waco Police Department Ben Rush on the stand, to which he describes the turmoil of the day and starts to weep, and shortly there after Reyna asks for a recess to set up the video.
After the break Rush again describes his patrol units position in the Central Texas Market Place parking lot, and at 40:00 Abel Reyna questions Rush by asking if
“Jason Davis is Nikki Stones ‘field training officer'” in the video playing for the jury. He responds yes, earlier he commented on how new she was. (Interesting to have a brand new patrol officer training on such an important event where WPD are at the ready with automatic weapons.)

Second Round of testimony on 10-23-2017

video

Officer of the Court | Sgt. Cory J. Ledbetter | AKA Red Boots

There have been several attempts to properly identify the Law Enforcement and Undercover Officers within the Motorcycle Clubs involved in the Twin Peaks Ambush, and most have been unsuccessful due to the fact that the agents in question look very similar.
Let’s start with the most famous UC of them all, ole Red Boots.

DPS at Twin Peaks May 17th, 2015
Law enforcement officers talk to a man near the parking lot of a Twin Peaks Restaurant Sunday, May 17, 2015, in Waco, Texas, after a shooting involving rival biker gangs. Waco police Sgt. W. Patrick Swanton told KWTX-TV there were multiple victims after gunfire erupted between the gang members. (Rod Aydelotte/Waco Tribune Herald via AP)

cory.ledbetter@dps.texas.gov Sgt. Cory Ledbetter BREATH TEST OPERATOR CERTIFICATION RECORD, breathalyzer certifications from 2011. Ledbetter started with DPS in January 07, 2002 (13 years ago) down in the Victoria, Texas area.

Cory Ledbetter Victoria TX – 2011

Cory Ledbetter Victoria TX
Cory Ledbetter Victoria TX

Here is a picture of Cory Ledbetter from 2011 from the Victoria Advocate. From this picture of Cory Ledbetter he looks very much like a person seen at the scene of a crime in Waco, Tx. on May 17th, 2015.

With a beard this person would look very similar to the now infamous Red Boots.

Cory J Ledbetter DPS
Cory J Ledbetter DPS 2011

 

The resemblance is very unsettling to any potential witnesses who might have seen 3 different men up close, but at separate times and/or at different places.

 

Cory J Ledbetter is Red Boots
Cory J Ledbetter is Red Boots

Aging Rebel reported the following in the article titled – Texas DPS Version: “On 05-17-15 at about 10:30 AM, Special Agent Frost drove by Twin Peaks parking lot and observed what appeared to be employee’s only at the restaurant. Special Agent Frost proceeded to the DPS CID briefing location which was the Flying J Truck Stop parking lot located at 2409 South New Road in Waco. Once at the Flying J, Special Agent Frost met with Special Agents Cory Ledbetter, Justin Overcast, Mark Gerik, Chris Dale and Lieutenant Schwartz. While in the parking lot, Special Agents observed a large number of unknown motorcycle club or OMG members walking around and through the parking lot conducting what appeared to be counter surveillance. Special Agents moved the briefing to another location.”

Officer of the Court | Lt. Steven D. Schwartz

DPS Lt. Steven Schwartz seen here in an early DPS photo
DPS Lt. Steven Schwartz seen here in an early DPS photo
Lt. Steven Schwartz Aug 25th McLennan County Court States Witness
Lt. Steven Schwartz Aug 25th McLennan County Court States Witness
Tommy Witherspoon of the Waco Tribune Tweets - English Trial
Tommy Witherspoon of the Waco Tribune Tweets – English Trial

Steven Schwartz went from observing the Cossacks on the front porch on the East side of Twin Peaks (facing 35) to the North side of Twin peaks, which would be Don Carlos side.

Lt. Schwartz was in position on the East Side of Twin Peaks, then moves North
Lt. Schwartz was in position on the East Side of Twin Peaks, then moves North

Lt. Steven Schwartz Testimony – English Trial- watching Twin Peaks patio

(from the Aging Rebel Article – Texas DPS Version)  “During the briefing, surveillance observed a large group of Cossack members at Twin Peaks in and around the patio area. A decision was made during the briefing by Lieutenant Schwartz not to send undercover Special Agents into the restaurant. A decision was made for Special Agents to pair up to conduct surveillance of the area and gather intelligence. Special Agent Frost and Dale were in one vehicle with Lieutenant Schwartz, Special Agent Ledbetter and Overcast were paired and Special Agent Gerik and Detective Rogers were paired.”

Lt. Steven Schwartz says he saw support groups at the Flying J Truck Stop

(from Aging Rebel Article – Texas DPS Version) “On 05-17-15 at about 10:30 AM, Special Agent Frost drove by Twin Peaks parking lot and observed what appeared to be employee’s only at the restaurant. Special Agent Frost proceeded to the DPS CID briefing location which was the Flying J Truck Stop parking lot located at 2409 South New Road in Waco. Once at the Flying J, Special Agent Frost met with Special Agents Cory Ledbetter, Justin Overcast, Mark Gerik, Chris Dale and Lieutenant Schwartz. While in the parking lot, Special Agents observed a large number of unknown motorcycle club or OMG members walking around and through the parking lot conducting what appeared to be counter surveillance. Special Agents moved the briefing to another location.”

Lt. Steven D.  Schwartz of Texas Department of Public Safety – Special Agent

William & Morgan English Trial - McLennan County
William & Morgan English Trial – McLennan County

Lt. Steven Schwartz Testimony at Yager trial 8/24/15
At another trial this week for Bandido’s Chaplain Lawrence Yager, Lt. Steven Schwartz testified that when he went into Twin peaks that “it was like a tornado went through a gun and knife store.”

For the third trial against the Bandidos in which Schwartz testified against another member from out of state, it seems that Schwartz’ only role is to present false, conflicting, and slanderous information against one Motorcycle Club and leaving the other’s role alone.

Lt. Schwartz States Witness for Warren trial
Lt. Schwartz States Witness for Warren trial – Says “Parking lot looked like a Tornado went through a gun and knife store.”

(from Aging Rebel Article – Texas DPS Version) “Once information was confirmed that only the patio was rented and the main portion of the restaurant would be open to the public, a decision was made to have Special Agents working in undercover capacity to be inside the restaurant. These Special Agents would be inside the restaurant to conduct surveillance and gather intelligence from inside the restaurant. A CID Operational Plan was completed and will be maintained at the Waco DPS CID Office.”

Special Agents entered the parking lot of the Central Texas Market Place and began monitoring Twin Peaks at around 11:40 A.M. on 05-17-15. At approximately 12:24 P.M. Special Agent Gerik reported gunshots from the parking lot of Twin Peaks. Special Agents responded and assisted the Waco Police Department in securing individuals, administering first aid and securing the perimeter around Twin Peaks.”

Officer of the Court James Head – Waco Police Department

What is the Grand Juries role in a community?
Art. 20.07. FOREMAN SHALL PRESIDE. The foreman shall preside over the sessions of the grand jury, and conduct its business and proceedings in an orderly manner. He may appoint one or more members of the body to act as clerks for the grand jury.

Art. 20.09. DUTIES OF GRAND JURY. The grand jury shall inquire into all offenses liable to indictment of which any member may have knowledge, or of which they shall be informed by the attorney representing the State, or any other credible person.

WPD James Head playing card
WPD James Head playing card

Waco police detective named foreman of grand jury that may hear Twin Peaks cases

Posted: Wednesday, July 8, 2015 6:01 pm By TOMMY WITHERSPOON twitherspoon@wacotrib.com

A Waco police detective was selected Wednesday to preside over a new McLennan County grand jury that could be the panel that considers the Twin Peaks shootings.

The grand jury was selected using the new state-mandated random method.

James Head, a 34-year police veteran who has spent 26 years with Waco PD, was among the first 14 on the panel qualified to serve on the grand jury and, beyond that, 19th State District Judge Ralph Strother selected Head to serve as the foreman.

After the 12 members of the grand jury, plus two alternates, were chosen, Head, wearing his police badge and service pistol, entered the grand jury chambers with the others to begin considering about 100 criminal cases presented by the McLennan County District Attorney’s Office.

This panel, which will meet twice a month for the next three months, could consider indictments against the 177 bikers arrested in the wake of the May 17 Twin Peaks shootout that left nine dead and 20 wounded. A grand jury, at some point, also will review Waco police officers’ actions in response to the melee that broke out between rival biker groups that day.

But former Appeals Court Justice Jan Patterson, justice in residence at Baylor Law School and a former federal prosecutor who has years of experience with grand juries, said the detective’s service could be problematic.

Of course, it is up to the judge, but it would be very difficult for a police officer to serve,” she said. “All of the cases the grand jury considers are criminal cases, and in many circumstances, a police officer will know the parties. It may be difficult to be impartial, and I would think it will be difficult, as well, to appear impartial, which are both important functions for a grand jury.””

From LinkedIn resume:

Waco Police Department

October 1988 – Present (27 years 10 months)

“I started police work in 1979 as a reserve police officer with the city of Beverly Hills, Texas. I then started working for them full time in 1981. I later went to the city of Robinson, Texas for almost a year and then went to work for the Waco Police Department in 1988. I worked two years in patrol and then went to CID where I have worked ever since. I am currently working in the Theft Unit of the Neighborhood Services Section of Waco PD.”

Officer of the Court | Jason Barnum | AKA Duct Tape

Being out of work as a cop in McLennan county will not last long. All of the local PD’s are full of wash outs from other jurisdictions. Barnum was fired from Bellmead PD before the Sheriff swore him in as a jailer in May 2017, seen here on the book of faces.

jason barnum sworn in by Parnell McNammara-5-8-17
jason barnum sworn in by Parnell McNammara-5-8-17

This man must be under a heavy amount of stress, his home, job, club, are all falling apart.

Don’t be a used car dealer with your emotions, own the lemons and make no more excuses to NOT change for the better. We are only as sick as our secrets. There are innocent men and women who no longer have the freedom to wake up and your mistakes not haunt them. It will follow you where ever you go, so do what is right and admit you were following orders. If not orders from your immediate supervisor, who was it?

If you let these innocent men go down because you had orders, why do you work for a company like that? Even soldiers can disobey orders, and they might not beat the ride, but they will eventually beat the wrap. What more do you have to loose, a pension?

The following story from 2016 is from the Waco Tribune and describes Barnum’s demise, and his momentary lapse of reason.

Firing upheld for Waco police sergeant who attacked doctor

By TOMMY WITHERSPOON twitherspoon@wacotrib.com

“A former Waco police sergeant who was fired last year for attacking a doctor who had an affair with his wife has lost an appeal of his indefinite suspension.

Arbitrator Norman Bennett, who presided over Jason Barnum’s civil service appeal of his firing, ruled that Police Chief Brent Stroman’s recommendation to fire Barnum was appropriate despite Barnum’s otherwise exemplary record during his 16-year career.

Barnum, 39, asked to be reinstated and claimed Stroman’s actions were not consistent with how he treated other officers in similar disciplinary situations.

Stroman declined comment on the arbitrator’s ruling.

Bennett’s ruling comes three months after he conducted a hearing in Barnum’s case. Barnum, who has won numerous commendations during his career, said he likely will not appeal Bennett’s decision and thinks his law enforcement career could be over. He said he does not have a job now and is uncertain what his future holds.

Barnum admitted he punched Dr. Eric Walker in the face while on duty and while driving a city-issued truck in June 2015. He was not wearing a police uniform at the time and was on his lunch break.

Barnum testified that Walker and Barnum’s wife had an affair from October to December 2014 and that he warned Walker several times to stay away from his wife after Walker’s wife learned of the affair and told Barnum.

He called Walker several times to talk about the situation and later confronted the doctor about the affair in a stairwell at Walker’s office.

Walker, an infectious disease specialist, admitted during the hearing that he has had numerous affairs with nurses and was fired from his medical practice in November.

Walker said Barnum told him during the stairwell confrontation that “at some point, the devil’s going to come calling if you keep living your life this way, but it’s not going to be me.”

Barnum said he intentionally left his gun in his truck during his conversation with Walker.

Seven months later, Barnum said he saw Walker driving by as Walker was on his way back to work from lunch. He said emotion took over and he followed Walker back to his office, parked his city truck behind Walker’s truck and approached the doctor.

Walker testified at Barnum’s appeal hearing that he saw a man coming toward him but he did not recognize Barnum because he had on sunglasses and had a long beard. Walker said he partially rolled down the window, thinking the man was lost and needed directions.

He said Barnum punched him in the face and tried to hit him several more times while the doctor tried to deflect the blows.

Walker said he reached for a gun he carried in his back pocket but couldn’t get it out because he was sitting on it.

Walker said he called police after Barnum left.

Barnum said this week he deserved to be reprimanded and suspended for a time. But he thinks being fired for what he called a momentary lapse in judgment was too extreme.

“It was a personal issue. But now my career is over for five minutes of a lapse in judgment,” Barnum said. “It is my own fault. You can’t go back in time and say, ‘Hey, you have too much to lose. Don’t do that.’ I saw him that day, and my emotions got triggered. If I had put rational thought behind it, I wouldn’t have done it. But my family was jeopardized by this man, and I reacted with a poor decision. We are human. We have emotions.”

Assault classification

Barnum said he disagrees with the opinions of Stroman and department investigators, who said the assault constituted at least a Class A misdemeanor because Walker had a black eye, a swollen face and an abrasion over his eye.

Barnum said Walker’s injuries were slight at worst, and the incident easily could have been classified as a Class C assault.

Stroman, a 38-year department veteran, testified he has been involved in a number of officer disciplinary cases, but in his eight years as chief has never retained an officer who committed an offense more severe than a Class B misdemeanor.

Walker did not file charges and testified he did not do so for fear that the publicity would damage his medical practice.

In deciding to fire Barnum in September, Stroman determined the sergeant “brought discredit on the department.””